Walter Jackson, #82 on the ‘John and Sara’ Passenger List

Every attempt has been made to ensure accuracy; please independently verify all data.

Published on: 04 Dec 2014
Updated: 20 Oct 2016

Descendants and Researchers:
Susan GradySusan.Grady@ssa.gov – Descendant & Researcher
Wayne Mitchellgwmitchell_46@yahoo.com – Descendant & Researcher
B. Craig Stinsoncstinson8150@gmail.com – Researcher

First Generation in the New World

1. WALTER JACKSON, was born presumably in Scotland and died at Durham, New Hampshire in 1683. He married before 1663, JANE (_____). Jane married, second, Henry Rice.

Biographical Notes:
1. From Wayne Mitchel at gwmitchell104@pobox.com on 19 Oct 2016:
“The dates-of-birth and birth order of Walter’s children are uncertain.
It is possible that either William or Elizabeth is the child conceived
by Jane before she married Walter, for which she accused Andrew Wiggin
in 1667.” ~ Wayne, Susan, and Craig
2. Submitted by B. Craig Stinson, “Walter Jackson, a prisoner from the Battle of Worcester, was probably purchased originally by Valentine Hill.  Unlike most of his peers Jackson may have remained at Oyster River after his indenture was complete.  He married a woman named Jane who was a live-in “servant maid” of our ancestor in-law Andrew Wiggin.  In 1667 Jane bore a child that she claimed was fathered by her master Andrew Wiggin.  The baby was evidence of the indiscretion; Jane Jackson was found guilty and offered ten “stripes” or a fine of £4 plus court costs, which fine Walter Jackson paid.  Andrew Wiggin was acquitted. They had five children together.  Walter died in 1683.  His widow remarried.” SEE: Sources and Notes below.
3. “Assuming we are right about there only being one wife, then yes, it has
to be Jane who was killed in the Indian raid in 1694.  In the report,
she is styled “Mrs. Jackson,” although she had married a second time and
was by then the widow of Henry Rice (whose daughter from a previous
marriage later married her son James).” ~ Wayne

Children of Walter and Jane (_____) Jackson:
2.  i. WILLIAM JACKSON, b. about 1669.
2. ii. ELIZABETH JACKSON,
2. iii. MARY JACKSON,
2. iv. JANE JACKSON,
2. v. JAMES JACKSON, born about 1681.

 

 

________________________________________________________
Scots at Oyster River
Walter Jackson (d. 1683)

Walter Jackson, a prisoner from the Battle of Worcester, was probably purchased originally by Valentine Hill.  Unlike most of his peers Jackson may have remained at Oyster River after his indenture was complete.  He married a woman named Jane who was a live-in “servant maid” of our ancestor in-law Andrew Wiggin.  In 1667 Jane bore a child that she claimed was fathered by her master Andrew Wiggin.  The baby was evidence of the indiscretion; Jane Jackson was found guilty and offered ten “stripes” or a fine of £4 plus court costs, which fine Walter Jackson paid.  Andrew Wiggin was acquitted.  They had five children together.  Walter died in 1683.  His widow remarried. Walter Jackson

John & Sara #82
A Scotch prisoner and probably first there in service at the mills [GDMNH 373]
Homestead on north side of Oyster River between William Beard and Philip Chesley [GDMNH 373]
10 January 1658-9 – received as an inhabitant of Oyster River [GDMNH 373]
early 1663 – was an appraiser of Alexander Mackdouel’s estate in ???
[Stinson note: along with William Furbish]
1663 – had a wife Jane in 1663 [HTDNH 80]
1666 – was granted 20 acres “at the head of his one [own] lot betwixt the Cow path and the swamp.” [HTDNH 66]
[Stinson note: this land was on Beard’s Creek on the north side of the Oyster River; see map p48 HTDNH]
25 June 1667 – “Sd Wiggin then to answer ye charge Lade to him in begetting Walter Jacksons wife with child while she Lived with him” [NHCR 225]  [Jane was Andrew Wiggin’s indentured maid.]
WJ 1st Para 2 25 June 1667 – Jane Jackson found guilty of fornication and fined 10 stripes or £4 plus court costs, which Walter Jackson paid.

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 3.34.35 PM 2

17 September 1667 – Walter Jackson in court “concerning ye wrong Mr. Andrew Wiggins had done to his wife in begetting her with child while she Lived with said Wiggin as his servant made”.  Wiggin was acquitted. [NHCR 227-228]
1683 – Walter Jackson died
18 March 1697-8 – his will administered to son William [GDMNH 373]
Five children listed [GDMNH 373]

W. J. Map 2

Sources:
HTDNH History of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire, vol. 1, Everett S. Stackpole and Lucien Thompson, 1913, pp. 48, 66, 80.
GDMNH Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire, Noyes, Libby, and Davis, Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928-1939, p373.
NHCR New Hampshire Court Records 1640-1692, vol. 40, Ed. Otis G. Hammond, The State of New Hampshire, 1943, pp. 224, 225, 227-228.

B.Craig Stinson
August 16, 2016

SOURCES AND NOTES:
Written and submitted by Susan Grady:
Descendant and Researcher: Ms. Susan Marjorie Jackson Sinclair Green Grady Bowen, Falls Church, Virginia
“Walter Jackson was born in Scotland, possibly in Lanarkshire, in the village of Westburn, a region of Scotland southeast of Glasgow. He could read and write. For someone to have been able to read and write during the period was an indication that he came from a wealthy family. He had a brother James. His mother may have been named Elizabeth. Walter Jackson defied Oliver Cromwell (born 1599, died 1658, Lord Protector of Great Britain (1653-1658) and a Protestant Puritan.). Walter Jackson wanted to help Charles II (a Catholic and the son of King Charles I of Great Britain, who was beheaded by his English subjects in 1649) to become king of Great Britain. Charles II gathered an army and Walter Jackson joined his army. Walter Jackson was in the unit commanded by the Duke of Hamilton. The army and Charles II fought against Oliver Cromwell and Cromwell’s army at the Battle of Worcester on September 3, 1651 in Worcester, England. Cromwell defeated Charles II, who fled back to France, where he had been living. Three thousand Scots were taken prisoner by the soldiers of Oliver Cromwell at the battle of Worcester. Oliver Cromwell punished Walter Jackson. Cromwell sent Walter Jackson to Boston, Massachusetts Bay Colony on the ship John and Sara. It left England on November 8 or 11, 1651 and arrived in Boston on February 24, 1652. After the ship landed, a person bought the prisoners and paid the ship’s captain twenty pounds British sterling for each prisoner. This was the cost of the ship’s passage for one prisoner. The prisoner then had to work for this man from six to eight years as an indentured servant. After this time, the indentured servant was given his freedom and a grant of land. Walter Jackson and the other prisoners from the John and Sara were marched from Boston to Lynn, Massachusetts, a two-day trip, and kept in the Saugus House. Walter Jackson went to work for a Scots Presbyterian lowlander, who first went to Ireland and then to New Hampshire, who was named Mr. Nicholas Lissen. He worked in one of two of Mr. Lissen’s lumber mills in Exeter, New Hampshire. Walter Jackson then went to work for Mr. Valentine Hill. Born about 1603, in London, Mr. Hill was living in Boston in 1635. In 1649 he moved to Oyster River (now Durham), New Hampshire. At the end of his term of indenture Walter Jackson probably worked in Mr. Valentine Hill’s sawmill at the Falls on the Oyster River and married Jane (maiden name?) in 1663. Walter Jackson lived on the north side of the Oyster River in Durham. In 1683, Walter Jackson died in Durham. Walter Jackson had two sons by his first wife: William Jackson, who was captured by the Indians in the above-mentioned raid and managed to escape, and James Jackson. Ms. Susan M. Jackson Sinclair Green Grady of Falls Church, Virginia is descended from William Jackson. Mr. Thomas A. McKay of Arlington, Virginia is descended from James Jackson. In 1998 he self-published a book, Jacksons Descent from Walter Jackson of Oyster River (Durham), New Hampshire in the 1650’s. It is in the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. I own a copy of Mr. Thomas Mckay’s book about Walter Jackson. My 91-year-old mother, lives with me in Falls Church, Virginia. While doing research, we discovered that Walter Jackson was a very good friend of the prisoner Salamon Sinclare (Solomon Sinclair), who went to New Hampshire. In the 1980’s we met one of his descendants, Mr. Pete Sinclair Cummings, who lived in Worcester, Massachusetts.
– Submitted by Ms. Susan Marjorie Jackson Sinclair Green Grady Bowen, Falls Church, Virginia

 

3 Responses to Walter Jackson, #82 on the ‘John and Sara’ Passenger List

  1. Jack Hamilton says:

    Dear Ms Grady,

    I believe I am a descendant of Walter Jackson. His daughter Hannah (Annah) married my 8th Grandfather David Hamilton. David was also from Westburn Cambuslang, fought with Walter at the Battle of Worcester and was shipped on the John and Sara to Boston. He too worked in the New Hampshire Sawmill and, when his servitude was over, received 20 acres close to Walter. At this time Hannah arrived in America. They were married and had 7 or 8 children. My source comes from the book “The Hamiltons of Waterboro”.

    Jack Hamilton
    Mendon, Ma

  2. Jack Hamilton says:

    Ms Grady,

    My error. It was Richard Jackson, not Walter who fathered Annah. I went back to check my sources and discovered my error. Funny thing, I could have sworn that somewhere I had found Walter as her father. My apologies!

    Cheers!

    Jack Hamilton

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